Posts Tagged Facebook

On the Hunt with Social Media

Many people have been touting the great benefits of social media recently as a means to network, grow your business, or market your products/services (myself included); but the current economic crisis is highlighting where all this effort can really pay off – in the job hunt.  It’s important to note that most job leads come from good connections and social media… the old adage has never been more true, the best jobs are never advertised.  A recent article in ComputerWorld, Job Hunting? Use social networks to make crucial connections, by David Ramel, stresses the importance of using social media like LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter to network and make new connections.

Social media tools can be highly beneficial, if you know where to look.  For instance, yesterday @BostonTweet tweeted asking if anyone was graduating and looking for a job in the Boston area on Twitter.  With such a large following, @BostonTweet was able to retweet replies and get more coverage than people would have normally gotten had they just tweeted to their own followers.

@bostontweet - job hunt

Social media sites are also a great way to market yourself to potential employers.  Creating a twitback for your Twitter account allows you to provide a brief bio and links to your website, company, or blog, along with more detailed contact info.  LinkedIn allows you to show off basically your entire resume while joining relevant groups for your area of interest – on these groups, you can then post job queries, etc. to help get your name out there.  Hint: responding to other queries also helps!  Facebook is also in this same vein, but also lets you search for company profiles (as does LinkedIn – though Facebook may give you more of a feel for the work environment – check out March on Facebook).

Though these all sound like great outlets to get moving with your job hunt, David Ramel also gives some advice on what not to do:

10donts-for-job-hunters1

Social media, when used smartly, can be a great tool!

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Social Media Success Summit 2009

The Social Media Success Summit 2009 is a live online event starting Tuesday May 26th focusing on how to use social media to attract new customers and grow your business during the current economic downturn.  Social media tools like Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn can provide great exposure, site traffic, partnership opportunities, and new business leads.

Social Media Success Summit

Summit instructors will include social media superstar Gary Vaynerchuk, professional blogger Darren Rowse, Facebook business authority Mari Smith, LinkedIn authority Jason Alba, chief content officer for MarketingProfs Ann Handley, Copyblogger founder Brian Clark, Authority Blogger founder Chris Garrett, The Blog Squad co-founder Denise Wakeman, and Writing White Papers author Michael A. Stelzner – all of whom have made great strides with social media campaigns and networking.

With the growing importance of social media, a how-to session with experts such as these, might not be a bad idea – even if you think you already know all the techniques to leverage tools like Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

LinkedInThe explosion of social media has been astounding – Facebook has grown so much that if it were a country, it’d be the eighth largest in the world!  Seems like social media is an important bandwagon to jump on, if you’re not already connected. And the current economic climate is just one more reason to get on board since social media is free and extremely effective for growing your business.

Though the Social Media Success Summit is a bit pricey ($297 until May 14th, $497 normally), the price of not understanding how to leverage social media tools and tactics is significantly higher.

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Stop tagging me, Dad!

The statistics Nate reflected on earlier this week should come as no surprise to those of us in our mid-twenties who have found ourselves, of late, frantically untagging Facebook photos posted by our parents in which we look unspeakably hideous and embarrassing. Yes, it’s inescapable – “old people” are on Facebook now. Related discussion of the generation gap among Facebook users (and reactions from some “old people” themselves!) has been ongoing this week at The XX Factor.

My own Facebook nightmare arrived late in the game… it was barely two months ago that I suggested to my father, jokingly, that he should be on Facebook. My fiancé’s parents are on Facebook, I explained, and it’s adorable! His immediate reaction was begrudging consideration. “I just don’t know what I would use it for.”

Within two hours my dad had posted his first Facebook photo album: Fish I Have Killed, the contents of which are exactly what you’re imagining. Within 24 hours my stepmom had a Facebook account, then my two aunts, then a variety of my parents’ friends and neighbors, all posting on each other’s walls with wild joy and abandon… and intense frequency.

Then came the mortification. Photo albums filled with family pictures of me at my most awkward, worst-dressed, and ill-maintained – all several years old and now at the top of Facebook’s “Photos of Me,” flouting proper chronology and pushing more current, flattering photos down the queue, provoking both my vanity and obsessive-compulsion in one fell swoop! Come ON, Dad!

In fact, the whole thing’s still kind of cute. But it does demonstrate a permeating fact of the social web age: it is becoming less and less realistic to break your public image into facets for each audience, and to hold back artifacts inconsistent with your desired branding. The answer, again, is to stop scrambling for control and start building. Identity is a constructive process, and the only way you can come close to controlling yours is to be the primary purveyor of content about you. Especially now that your Dad and all those fish are on Facebook.

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Where is privacy hiding?

Privacy issues are surfacing everywhere…

Two weeks ago Facebook suffered its third outrage around user privacy after announcing terms of agreement changes that had users horrified that their data and content could become property of the behemoth social network; on Monday, New York Times reporter Saul Hansell wrote an article about the World Privacy Forum’s most recent report on cloud computing privacy concerns; and just yesterday, John Foley covered a new survey by Kelton Research in InformationWeek’s blog Plug Into the Cloud, showing that security concerns are one of the top two reasons holding businesses back from adopting cloud services.

While the connection between Facebook and cloud computing may not seem that clear at first, they both support the undeniable fact that everything is moving online.

To give you a better example of how closely these social and high-tech applications are connected, take a look at Google’s Gmail outage earlier this week. While Gmail accounts via Web access were down for approximately 2.5 hours, Venturebeat reports that people accessing it through their IMAP accounts – what you might use on an iPhone – never even noticed there was a problem… a clear “victory” for cloud computing, according to Tim Beyers of Motley Fool.

It’s clear that cloud computing and social applications like Facebook and Gmail are here to stay, but until we can find ways to adequately meets concerns for privacy, people – and businesses – are just going to have to decide if potentially losing some privacy is worth the benefits.

(…As I was writing this, TechCrunch tweeted a new story on Facebook’s plans to open it’s terms of service for user input – staying true to its roots of promoting a more open and shared environment. Will be interesting to see what ensues….)

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